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Friends of LITA | Q&A With Saul Conrad

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

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All of us here at the Light In The Attic clubhouse are excited to be distributing the latest album from Boston’s Saul Conrad. A Tyrant And Lamb, out now on Cavity Search Records, is his third studio album and is on heavy rotation here in the office. We recently caught up with Saul for a short Q&A. You can read our interview with him below and stream his new album A Tyrant And Lamb from popmatters.com!

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1. What was your process like while recording this new album? Can you tell us a little about the approach you take when you’re in the studio?

We (Jason Bitner, who produced this album, and I) started working with an idea in mind that had very little to do with where we arrived. I’m normally too anxious after finishing one record to sit around waiting for the release to pan out. So often a flood of new bits and pieces of songs starts a couple months after finishing something and I get pretty involved in it. In this case I started with a whole idea about a drum feel that was on the line between straight four rock and country shuffle. And some honky tonk progressions and melodies.

We had much of the album we imagined we were going to make close to completion, with 6 or 7 tracks recorded — and then it was time to go on tour for the previous album. So we dropped everything and worried about shows, traveling with a parrot (my parrot at that stage wasn’t well and was refusing to eat on his own–he’d only accept food from me via a syringe, so we had to bring him and feed him 4x/day in the van), and motel rooms that often smelled of fresh crack. We were terrified the fumes would do Chico in–many nights we had his little travel perch (his “bird motel”) set right above the TV in order to keep a close eye on him. We’d watch with a silhouette of a parrot missing from the center of the screen. There were some great shows at alternative venues–for example in a house on a block where 5-10 abandoned houses were being squatted by a whole community of friends. There were awful nights in about equal measure—one particularly, in Dallas, where we played for a few businessmen in black suits with black ties and shiny black shoes (looking like demented preachers doused in oil) who were casually whispering over mixed drinks and fake candle light to their dates.

When we got back to Boston we trashed much of what we already had recorded. It sounded put on–forced into this style I was obsessed with at the time, but not emotionally true, or that relevant to how I was feeling anymore. If its relevance had faded that quickly and it wasn’t holding together I knew we had to get rid of it and chalk it up to a first stage that would hopefully lead us somewhere more meaningful. I actually ended up taking pieces of those original songs and building new songs around them. Seeing that one could trash large amounts of work, and that in some cases it freed me to find more rewarding solutions to finishing the songs was kind of a revelation for me.

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2. Do you have a favorite track from the album?

I think I might like Galga the best–I’m usually excited to perform it. It returns me to a place, or a kind of terror I felt a lot in the past, but allows me to sort of share it, aggressively, on my own terms, and escape, or reverse the feelings of real life, for a couple of minutes.

3. Your new album is titled A Tyrant And Lamb. Can you explain the meaning behind the title?

It comes from the characters that can crawl into your head if you get into one of William Blake’s prophecies. I guess the lambs and the tyrannical forces are even in play in some of his earliest works too. This album intends to take a very careful look at the voice of the protagonist (myself, I guess), without making any approximations or averages. To see some truth I have to be able to watch and chart myself turning from a lamb into a tyrant (in a long-term sort of way, chronologically through my life), and back and forth all the time. It also studies a couple of the relationships that are and have been extremely important to me, and how those relationships often seem rooted in the opposing force between the tyrant and the lamb. But the roles can switch–which is why, though the cover may implicate one person at first look, both people have a bit of satanic blush on their cheeks, and the eye is slightly discouraged from associating anyone permanently with either role.

4. You mentioned that while you worked on this album you read a lot by Søren Kierkegaard and William Blake. Do you feel that the themes of what you were reading manifested themselves in your lyrics?

The lyrics were meant to reflect things I found within myself, but the method of search and excavation is largely indebted to what I learned from Kierkegaard’s The Sickness Unto Death and Blake’s The Four Zoas. The whole ebb and flow of the album–the slow revelation of various horrors, broken and lost parts of human potential, weakened relationships, with turn-arounds, potential ways to find the good path & strength mixed in, and leading up to the final accusation at the end of “Bulls”–is deeply informed by the Zoas, which is a massive and torturous journey to the threshold of hope.

Particularly in the song “Hollow”, the idea of a personally disastrous paradox, of the need to destroy your origin to become someone real, the climax of that song if you love someone kill their family in their mind / and set them free / climb into a balloon is something I learned from The Sickness.

5. What other artists or musicians have influenced your music and songwriting?

Blaze Foley Wanted More Dead Than Alive (I especially tried to sing in a way akin to Blaze in the middle section of the 7th track “Bumbling Fool”), Gram Parsons, Townes Van Zandt (High, Low and in Between, Flyin’ Shoes, Delta Momma Blues) Syd Barrett (The Madcap Laughs), Harry Nilsson (the vocals, specifically on his album of standards A Little Touch of Schmilsson in the Night, Nilsson Sings Newman, and Son of Schmilsson), Elliott Smith’s From a Basement on the Hill (his vocal sound, and the way he mixed distorted dissonant, aggressive electric guitars with sweeter, picked acoustic)

I guess it’s hard to know for sure because a lot of stuff (especially from when I was younger playing classical music) may be floating around in my head somewhere that perhaps I’m not even aware of, but that is leading me places and informing what I’m trying to do with songs and melodies.

6. You hail from a long lineage of musicians. I read that your great uncle escaped Nazi Germany during WWII and went on to become an acclaimed pianist. Have you ever collaborated with him or asked his advice when writing music?

I actually have performed with him–Mozart’s double piano concerto. When I went to NYC to practice with him, for hours on multiple days I couldn’t get through the first few measures without a meltdown from him. My approach, my attitude, speed, technique, musicality, rhythm…everything was a disaster. But we got through that stage (and I got through the headaches and nerves that accompanied these rehearsals) and he came to show me a level of rigor, technically, but also in terms of interpreting a piece of music, and having a detailed, studied, thoroughly conceived plan for musicality and dynamics. It was an honor and once in a lifetime experience to play with him.

I’ve never talked to him about writing music, and he’s quite old now (and wasn’t really as present in my life for the period when I started writing). He never composed (as far as I know), but at birthday parties he would play Happy Birthday in the styles of 10 or more different composers. He was so intimately aware of their work and their voices–it was like they’d walked into the room in a casual mood and started making up variations to the melody themselves. His creative energy was completely tied up with his interpretations and understanding of others’ compositions. For most of his life he could play any Beethoven sonata by heart.

7. What are you listening to these days?

Josh from Light In The Attic gave me Bob Frank’s first record, which is stunning. Each song is a story. And some of them are riddles, or something like that–there’s room to draw a lot from the sparse outlines, and try to interpret. Maybe it’s sort of Biblical: The ellipsis, and the beauty. I’ve been listening Big Star’s Third/Sister Lovers. No one seems to share my opinion on this, but I really don’t much care for Big Star’s first two records. This one though has blown me away. The sounds–the strings mixed with all kinds of electric sounds–Jim Dickinson’s production, the writing, the singing…It’s got maniacally upbeat ecstasy in some songs, true tender veins elsewhere, and the sad calm when all those feelings burn out too.

I got a new record that collects a lot of Luke McDaniel’s songs…I am particularly moved by “Drive On”, “Homeward Mule”, and “You’re Still on my Mind”.

I’ve been returning over and over to Mozart: Don Giovanni (Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Josef Krips with Cesare Siepi) and the Requiem Mass (the Harnoncourt version). And then, to try to undo the hypnotizing beauty, the terror, the turning feelings, to relax, or move to a completely different, simpler mood, I’ve been counter-balancing that listening with the Dead: Workingman’s Dead, Europe ’72 (mainly for the set of “China Cat Sunflower” “I Know You Rider” and “Brown-eyed Woman”) and Live at The Fillmore East (for “Bertha”!).

Denny at Cavity Search Records sent me Jerry Joseph’s self-titled, which I think is a subtle record with stunning guitar work, and lyrics that are bold in scope and tackle –it seems to me– mangled, complex and deep-mind emotions. (My favorite tracks are “Pony” and “Bouncing Very Well”–the romantic songs)

I played with Joey Molinaro in Pittsburgh this winter and got his record The Inalienable Dreamless. He performs virtuosic, high energy sets on violin with a foot-pad to add percussion and a bit of vocal additions too from time to time. It’s like war music to me in a sense–fascinating, aggressive, demanding and different.

8. What’s on the horizon for you? Any plans for an upcoming tour?

I’m going to be on tour for a lot of the summer…in June a loop from Boston up through upstate New York and west to Chicago, down to Baton Rouge, and then back up the east coast. In August a trip that starts in Montana, heads west and then down the coast from Seattle to southern CA. (all the dates are HERE)

I’m also getting pretty far into work on a new album–musically a completely different sort of thing–a kind of Mass. Anyway, A Tyrant and Lamb is out this Tuesday. The guys at Musicol pressing remastered the whole record for vinyl, and it really sound its best like that. (And it’s not coming out on CD right now). It’s a limited edition of 300 copies.

Check out the music video for Saul Conrad’s “Carousel” below.

Weekly Distro Roundup with Jon Treneff!

Thursday, May 15th, 2014
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I don’t know what it’s like in your thrift store corner of the world, but out here in the wet ‘n wild west, it’s been something like a HEAT-WAAAAVE.  You know what else is hot?!  SLUMBER PARTIES, HIPPIES, and TOURING!!!  So get all up in this sweat lodge and have yourself some visions – of  the hot jams you’ve been missin’!

 


 

Just when you’re expecting another ’80′s synth banger, Death Waltz sucker-punches you with this!  Don’t get us wrong, we got nuthin’ against the ’80′s synth bangers, but THIS – this is a CLASSIC horror soundtrack.  And when we say classic, we mean Phantom of The Opera / Dracula / Haunted Funhouse of Horrors kind of a vibe.  And when we say Funhouse, we mean a real ORGAN GRINDER.  If you still don’t follow, this is what would be playing while you were quietly crapping your pants at the carnival or the haunted corn maze, or whatever they did for fun in Oklahoma.  Scary in the way that clowns, scarecrows, and mimes are still scarier than 100 Freddy Kruegers surrounding you like the maypole.

 


The Black Hippies – The Black Hippies
(Academy LPs)

Here at LITA HQ NW, we’re beyond pumped to have the estimable Academy LPs joining the distro stable!  If you’re not already familiar, this new reissue from The Black Hippies is a perfect place to start, showcasing everything this label has become known for in the last few years.  Like it’s predecessors, this jam is another deep cut from the ’70′s Afro-Fuzz scene – and one of the more high-stepping rump-shakers from a scene that has it’s share.  A uniquely African interpretation of the hard rock, funk, and disco that was making it’s way into the Nigerian nightclubs from Europe and overseas, and will the knock yer socks off if you dug the Ofege record.  Get Hip(py)!

 

Merchandise / Milk Music / Destruction Unit – USA ’13 Split
(540 or Fight)

 

The best kind of 3-car pile-up from some of the more engaging bands working in the American psych/punk underground today.  Serving as something of a postcard from the tour these bands did together last year, this split highlights the stylistically divergent approaches each of them are taking in their attempts to stretch the boundaries of what a “psychedelic” band can be.  Merchandise delves further into the atmospheric, ethereal soundscapes their new label home, 4AD has built it’s house on, while Milk Music keeps driving further from their scrappy SST punk beginnings, winding down somewhere out in the Crazy Horse desert sunset.  Destruction Unit – well, they do what they do – to great effect, laying down minimal, encrusted garage riffs and slowly building them to frenzied, peyote nightmares.  The best split release since the Boys Life / Christie Front Drive 10″- and in retrospect, those bands kinda sucked.  Features all previously unreleased material.

All titles mentioned above are available through our online shop or at our Seattle record shop (913 NW 50th St., Ballard). The shop is open Friday 12-8pm and Saturday 12-4pm.

Weekly Distro Roundup with Jon Treneff!

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

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Time flies, they say – and they were saying the truth. With Record Store Day behind us, and Holy Thursday but a fleeting whisper in our memory, the days and months just keep on truckin’ along here. Who said it could be May already? In fact, we’re already planning our review of the deluxe 25th anniversary reissue of Breaking Bad, cause like our Senior Discount at Best Western, it’s right around the corner. Like the man said – such a short time to be here, and something something something to be gone.

 

Dave Porter – Breaking Bad OST
(Spacelab 9)

The soundtracks continue to flow like Niagara over here – and when they’re this good, we shan’t be complainin’! Look, I don’t know Hank from Henry, but if you think that’s gonna stop me from sinking my wooden teeth into this babyshit double pack, you better get back on the pumpkin truck. Dave Porter’s skeletal, pulsing soundtrack manages to engage at every turn – with or without a bald a-hole shoving a barrel in your back. Limited and going fast!

 

Posse – Soft Opening
(Beating A Dead Horse)

Posse have been kicking around the Seattle DIY scene for a few years, and it’s been a pleasure watching their evolution from a frantic Breeders-esque trio (a good thing) to what we have here (a great thing). Soft Opening marks a major step forward, dialing down to a more stately tempo and letting things unwind more – a la Go-Betweens and Built To Spill. If those sound like token touchstones – well, they are. But let’s be honest – this is a mode very few have managed to appropriate well, much less improve upon. Posse do both, birthing a fully-formed paean to the beautiful, mundane struggle of day-to-day modern life. Like Neil said, “I know my problems are meaningless, but that don’t make ‘em go away.” Limited to 250. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

 

Neighbors – Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?
(Beating A Dead Horse)

Neighbors are the sophomore (and final?) release from Posse’s BADH label. Leader, Jose Diaz has been one of the key forces behind Seattle’s recent DIY revival, running an underground venue and recording some of the better exponents of this scene (Chastity Belt, Posse, Dude York). Neighbors pick up in the young tradition – mining the rich vein of C-86 / Rough Trade / Postcard bands that, with good reason, continue to inspire new generations. Aces high.

 

Goblin
(AMS restock direct from Italy!)

Our ship finally came in (again). We just received a massive restock on all of the highly coveted Goblin titles (Zombi, Suspiria, Tenebre, Profondo Rosso, etc) plus a few new selections of rich vintage to wet your whistle, including Goblin’s Amo Non Amo soundtrack from ’79, starring Terence Stamp and Jacqueline Bisset! Also disembarking are killer psych-prog jams from il Balletto di Bronzo, Biglietto Per L’Inferno, and a restock of Battiato’s essential mind-bender Foetus. Get some olde country lovin’ in your life while you can – these are bound to be gone with the morning wind.

All titles mentioned above are available through our online shop or at our Seattle record shop (913 NW 50th St., Ballard). The shop is open Friday 12-8pm and Saturday 12-4pm.

Wheedle’s Groove – Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987 | Pre-order!

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

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Wheedle’s Groove - Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987
LITA 108 (2xLP | CD | Digital)
Available:
Digital – May 20
CD & 2xLP – June 3
Pre-order Now!

We are very excited to announce our upcoming release of Wheedle’s Groove Vol. II, the second installment in the Wheedle’s Groove series documenting Seattle’s soul and funk scene from 1972 to 1987. 

In 2004, the first volume of Wheedle’s Groove shone a light on the formerly unheralded soul scene in 1960s and ‘70s Seattle, followed by a new album in 2008, and then an award winning feature-length documentary film. The on-going Wheedle’s Groove series continues to present a vast chapter of the city’s musical heritage that has little to do with long-haired rock dudes with guitars. No – in the world of Wheedle’s Groove, platform shoes and pimp hats were the order of the day.

But unlike Volume I, Seattle’s soul scene did not stop in 1975. A new volume, Wheedle’s Groove Vol. II, documents the period from 1972 to 1987, when funk was superseded by disco and modern soul. Heading into the ‘80s, artists in the Emerald City caught wind of the hip-hop and electro scenes that were growing in bigger cities across America, and gave the music their own distinct spin.

As the years unfurl in the tracks of Wheedle’s Groove Volume II, so does the recent history of American music, the songs tracing technological changes and social change, and music’s move from the club to disco as live bands moved aside for DJs. Witness Septimus, on the cusp of both, blending a live drummer with a Roland drum machine and cutting ‘Here I Go Again’ on a disco-friendly 12” single.

Separated from the major centers of soul music, Seattle was a scene that developed out of the gaze of the mainstream music industry, but one that moved just as fast. As John Studamire of the band Priceless remembers, “A lot of the groups around town would have to incorporate that disco sound or you’d sound totally dated.”

Seattle’s size and location had a great effect on its sound. Artists on the scene were accustomed to playing small, discreetly segregated club shows and pressing short runs of 45s for local radio stations. Touring happened mostly on a regional scale and artists popped up in a variety of different bands. Fans of Volume I will recognize some familiar names here: Robbie Hill’s Family Affair turn in the soul-jazz gem ‘Don’t Give Up’ and Cold, Bold & Together present the undeniable vocal beauty of ’Let’s Backtrack.’

Compiled and sequenced by Seattle’s DJ Supreme La Rock, this 18-track compilation will also introduce you to the long-forgotten blue-eyed soul boy Don Brown (‘Don’t Lose Your Love’) and frustrated talents Push, overlooked for record deals on account of singer “Big Joe” Erickson’s larger-than-life heft (‘You Turn Me On’). There’s Frederick Robinson III and his gospel-funk protest tune ‘Love One Another’, Tony Benton of Teleclere being Seattle’s answer to Prince (‘Steal Your Love’) and Seattle Mariners baseball star Lenny Randle bringing his teammates in to record ‘Kingdome’ in honor of their stadium.

* Compiled by DJ Supreme La Rock
* All tracks re-mastered
* CD & 2xLP housed in deluxe Stoughton “Tip-On” gatefold jackets
* New liner notes by Jonathan Zwickel with band interviews and rare archive photos
* Color vinyl editions:
+ LITA Vinyl Subscriber Exclusive – 200 on 180-gram “Seattle Supersonics” colored wax (LP 1 Green, LP 2 Yellow)
+ LITA.net Pre-order Exclusive – 200 on “Red Light Red” wax –> limit 2 per customer
+ LITA Shop Exclusive – 250 hand numbered jackets with 180-gram wax (LP 1 “Seattle Supersonics” tribute picture disc, LP 2 “Sonics” yellow/green split wax) –> *limit 2 per customer*

Stream Don Brown’s “Don’t Lose Your Love” from Wheedle’s Groove Vol. II below….

Donnie & Joe Emerson – Still Dreamin’ Wild: The Lost Recordings 1979-81 | Pre-order

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

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Donnie & Joe Emerson - Still Dreamin’ Wild: The Lost Recordings 1979-81
LITA 115 (LP | CD | Digital)
Available: June 17, 2014
Pre-order Now!

Some people have to wait for fame; some people wait even longer than most. Donnie and Joe Emerson are in a league of their own.

As teenagers in Fruitland, Washington in the late ‘70s, the farming brothers dreamed of being heard. The synthesizers were sometimes crude and the 8-track recorder had its limitations, but the brothers aimed at nothing short of perfection in their home studio on the farm. They titled their 1979 debut Dreamin’ Wild, and, as multi-instrumentalist Donnie later admitted, “Joe and I basically lived the dream of the title of the album.” The same goes for their parents who heavily believed in their sons’ musical dreams, taking out a second mortgage on the farm and investing $100,000 in a dream that refused to die. But their privately funded, private press record sank without trace, the family lost most of their 1,600 acre farm, and as Joe focused on the family farming business, Donnie focused on his solo career.

As for Dreamin’ Wild, things began to change three decades later, when record collector Jack Fleischer bought a copy of the album for $5 at a Spokane thrift shop. Something about the brothers’ smiles, bouffant hair, and matching white jumpsuits gave him a good feeling. Fleischer’s blogging about the album brought it to the attention of cult musician Ariel Pink, who recorded his own version of standout track “Baby.” Eventually re-released on Light In The Attic and widely available for the first time, the album chimed louder a lifetime after its conception: Pitchfork described it as a “a godlike symphony to teen hood.” The New York Times flew out to the family farm, while Jimmy Fallon took to Twitter to proclaim his love for the duo.

But Dreamin’ Wild does not tell the full story. In a relatively short span of time – just two and half years – the boys put close to 70 songs down on tape, all recorded at that magical home studio on the farm. A dozen of them are included here on Still Dreamin’ Wild: The Lost Recordings 1979-81 and ready to be enjoyed for the first time ever. With a familiar blend of FM rock, power pop, and new wave, these 12 tracks cover the entirety of that fruitful period, stretching from the second song Donnie ever recorded (“Everybody Knows It”) – to tracks documenting his temporary move to L.A. in 1981.

Donnie’s life story is in these songs. Where Dreamin’ Wild captures the teenage experience, Still Dreamin’ Wild tells a broader story, one in which teenage dreams turn to painful yearning. So where the Beach Boys indebted “Ooh Baby Yeah” is inspired by a teenage girlfriend, “Big Money” shows the emergence of a naive political awareness. Later, 1981′s “One True Love” captures the sound of what Donnie described as “the city as imagined from the farm,” and the epic closing track, “Don’t Disguise The Way You Feel” found Donnie after high school, feeling stifled and frustrated in the isolation of the countryside and mourning the loss of his friend and occasional backing vocalist Dwayne. It is, quite simply, heartbreaking.

The long-belated success of Dreamin’ Wild has given the Emerson brothers – still close, and still the heart of a loving family – a new lease of life. They’ve finally taken their music on the road, performing at Seattle’s Showbox followed by New York’s Mercury Lounge. Still Dreamin’ Wild proves that the album wasn’t a fluke, and that Donnie’s songwriting is as consistent as it is rare. All this time later, we finally have the pleasure of hearing the brothers’ music. And the good news? They’ve still got the jumpsuits.

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* Photo by David Black

  • First ever release
  • All tracks newly re-mastered from original tapes
  • LP housed in a deluxe Stoughton “Tip-On” gatefold jacket
  • Liner notes by Jack D. Fleischer, interviewing Donnie & Joe
  • LP includes download card
  • Color vinyl editions (comes with a “Jingle Demo Reel” 7″ featuring 4 unreleased jingles Donnie wrote for local Washington businesses back in the day)
    - 200 on “Snow White” wax + 7″ ( LITA Vinyl subscriber exclusive
    - 500 on “Baby Blue” wax + 7″ (LITA.net pre-orders exclusive – limit 2 per customer)
    - 100 on “Red/Black Shag” wax + 7″ (LITA Shop exclusive – limit 2 per customer)

Stream the track “Ride The tide” from Still Dreamin’ Wild: The Lost Recordings 1979-81 below…

Record Store Day 2014!

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

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Tis’ almost that time of the year again for Record Store Day, the one day out of the year in which we pay homage to the local merchants of music – the unsung heroes of the music business – the guys and gals of independent record stores. For those who worship at the altar of vinyl, Record Store Day is like Christmas and Thanksgiving all rolled into one because record labels worldwide release super-limited titles, picture discs, rarities and one-offs. It’s a day that we here at Light In The Attic hold dear to our hearts. To commemorate RSD 2014, taking place on Saturday, April 19th, we have three incredible releases to share with you.

 

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Built to Spill – Ultimate Alternative Wavers
MCR 907 (2xLP)

Modern Classics Recordings is proud to present for the first time on vinyl Built to Spill’s debut album, Ultimate Alternative Wavers. Showcasing a nod to Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr, UAW was recorded at Audio Lab Studios in the band’s hometown of Boise, Idaho and soon after released on Seattle imprint C/Z Records in 1993. Featuring former Treepeople member Doug Martsch, Caustic Resin’s Brett Netson, and drummer Ralf Youtz the album is filled with total rippers like the 9 minute “Built Too Long Parts 1, 2 & 3”. Other songs like “Nowhere Nothin’ Fucku”p is more of a hazy daze that lyrically pays homage to Velvet Underground’s “Oh! Sweet Nuthin”. Though it may have been the band’s debut, UAW still remains a special time capsule from one of modern rock’s great bands that are still going strong after 21 years.

 

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Stephen John Kalinich – A World Of Peace Must Come
LITA 039 (LP)

“A World Of Peace Must Come is his masterpiece. That was fantastic.” – Brian Wilson

“‘Be Still’ is the only song I’ve ever heard that made me want to be a better person.” – Brian Barr, The Seattle Weekly

“The only other artist as pure as him is Captain Beefheart.” – Bill Bentley

It was in the mid 60s that poet Stephen John Kalinich first met the Beach Boys. Kalinich was the first artist to sign to the Beach Boys new label Brother Records. His first songs to see release were “Little Bird” and “Be Still,” which he wrote with Dennis Wilson and were released on the Friends album. His relationship with Dennis would lead to a number of further collaborations and Kalinich / Wilson co-writes, including: 20/20 – “All I Want To Do,” Hawthorne, CA – “A Time to Live in Dreams”, Pacific Ocean Blue – “Rainbows,” and Bambu – “Love Remember Me.” A World of Peace Must Come was recorded at various LA studios and at Brian’s house in Bel-Air in 1969. The tapes were promptly lost, not to be heard again until our discovery of them in 2008. Following the CD-only reissue in that year, this is the first time this timeless snapshot of an era and an ethos will be available on vinyl for Record Store Day 2014.

 

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Michael Chapman –  Playing Guitar The Easy Way
LITA 114 (LP)

Along with Bert Jansch, Roy Harper, and John Martyn –  Michael Chapman is one of the most influential and important British singer/songwriter/folk guitarists of his generation. Like his peers, Chapman blended traditional folk influences with rock and jazz overtones for a unique sound that remains fresh to this day. Following on the heels of LITA’s previous Chapman reissues comes an ultra-rarity, 1978’s Playing The Guitar The Easy Way – an instructional record (complete with a 20 page booklet of notation) making its CD debut and reissued on vinyl for the first time ever!  For guitar geeks, it’s one of the first instructional methods to deal with open tunings like DADGAD. For Chapman fans, it’s merely a gas to listen to!

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*The LITA record shop will be open on RSD, April 19th, offering all our exclusive RSD releases, plus a good 70+ other RSD exclusive releases we hand picked, such titles include: Nirvana Pennyroyal Tea / I Hate Myself And Want To Die 7”, The Velvet Underground – Loaded, and Notorious B.I.G. – Life After Death + many more! View the full list of RSD exclusives HERE.

There will also be a 25% off sale on any non RSD products, along with some sweet giveaways throughout the day. The shop is located at 913 NW 50th St., Ballard and open on RSD from 9 am-5 pm.

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In celebration of Record Store Day, our friend and filmmaker Michael Reich made a short video showcasing our RSD 2014 releases. Check it out below…

Kris Kristofferson Tour Dates!

Monday, January 13th, 2014

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Kris Kristofferson will be performing live at the GRAMMY Foundation Legacy Concert  in Los Angeles on Thursday January 23rd!  The  show kickoffs Kristofferon’s 2014 tour through South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Tickets and more info at LightInTheAttic.net/TourDates.

“There’s A Dream I’ve Been Saving” Box Set | OUT NOW!

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

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ORDER NOW!

The day has finally come!  After 7 intense years in the making, our most expansive and lavishly packaged project to date: There’s A Dream I’ve Been Saving, commemorating the complete legacy of Lee Hazlewood Industries from 1966-1971, is finally out!

For more than a year now, we have been reissuing the solo work of this true American moustachioed maverick. Beyond restored versions of Lee’s debut Trouble is a Lonesome Town and the soundtrack A House Safe for Tigers, the lid has also been lifted on the rich, little-explored archives of the label Lee Hazlewood Industries (LHI), when Hazlewood was svengali and super-producer to a stable full of brilliant artists.

This landmark box set is the ultimate artifact for Lee Hazlewood heads new and old, containing a lavishly packaged, expansive 172-page LP sized hard cover book. But every good book deserves a soundtrack and in this case it comes in the form of a four-CD anthology of the LHI label, along with the never-before-released 1970 film Cowboy in Sweden on DVD. The CDs feature Hazlewood songs familiar and less so; surprising covers, doleful duets and little heard LHI gold.

One of the most impressive aspects of the LHI box set is the gorgeous 12”x12” LP sized book (perfect for your record shelf), packed with rare beautiful pictures of Lee, his artists (and the occasional horse). The pages roll out the full story of the LHI label, including interviews with Lee and Suzi Jane Hokum, re-assessments of key Hazlewood albums, and artist profiles for the label’s roster, lovingly written by renowned L.A. music journalist/novelist Jessica Hundley. In the illuminating text, a picture of Hazlewood emerges – fiercely talented, brutally independent, a rare, ornery, ruthless and visionary man.

A Deluxe Edition of the box set contains all of the above housed in a cloth-bound clamshell box with reproductions of LHI-era artifacts including press photos and a reproduction plane ticket used by Hazlewood back in ‘70. But the true icing on the cake is three data discs which include just about every 45 single and every LP ever released on LHI — in both WAV and MP3 formats. At around 17 albums and 72 singles (totaling 305 songs!), that’s a whole lot of Lee.

*Video By David Black

THE SET INCLUDES:

  • 172 Page Hard Cover Book:
    - LP-sized cloth bound book with gold foil stamp
    - Over 150 rare &
unseen photos
+ In depth essays
    - LHI history, album breakdowns, 27 artist profiles, LHI timeline, and interviews with Lee & dozens of label alum.
  • Cowboy in Sweden The Film, on DVD (1970, 60 mIns):
    - First time available. New digital transfer from the original 16mm master negative at the Swedish Broadcasting Co. Fully restored in HD with re-mastered sound. Region Free.
  • 4 CDs (107 Tracks):
    - Meticulously Re-mastered. Analog transfers captured at 24-bit/96-kHz. 95% of transfers from original analog master tapes (remainder transferred from mint vinyl).
    - DISCS 1 & 2: Everything Lee recorded for LHI, including every 45 single and album (Cowboy in SwedenFortyThe Cowboy & The Lady, and Requiem For an Almost Lady), plus a handful of unreleased tracks.
    - DISCS 3 & 4: Key tracks from the LHI stable
 of artists, including Suzi Jane Hokom, The Kitchen Cinq, Ann-Margret, Honey Ltd., The International Submarine Band, Arthur, The Aggregation, Sanford Clark, Lynn Castle, The Surprise Package, Virgil Warner, and Hamilton Streetcar, amongst many others.
    - 14 unreleased tracks
  • From Lee’s Personal ‘Stache:
    - Flexi disc featuring unheard Lee ‘studio chatter’ (“Play it like a cowboy song”)
    - Reproduction of Lee’s original embossed LHI business card
    - 5 random copies include a “Golden Ticket” for a free subscription to Light In The Attic’s Lee Hazlewood Archive Series

DELUXE EDITION EXTRAS:

(Note: Deluxe Edition includes everything above from Standard Edition plus the below extras)

  • 3 DVDs (305 Tracks):
    - LHI catalog as both WAVs & MP3s (320 Kbps) – covering 17 albums and 138 A&B sides. DVDs exclude The International Submarine Band.
    - Meticulously re-mastered
    - DISC 1: LHI catalog (MP3 w/ cover art)
    - DISC 2: LHI LPs (WAV w/ cover art)
    - DISC 3: LHI 45 Singles (WAV w/ label art)
  • Cloth Bound Clamshell Box:
    - Gold foil stamped and debossed silhouette of Lee
  • From The LHI Vault:
    - 6 glossy LHI promo photos
    - 1970 Hazlewood Airlines ticket

 

*Video By Jessica Hundley

Also, to celebrate this release, we’re rolling out some dandy LHI tees. If there is one tee shirt Lee Hazlewood would’ve worn, it’s this one. Silk-screened American Apparel tees available in sizes S-XL at LightInTheAttic.net!

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Mark Lanegan – Has God Seen My Shadow? An Anthology 1989-2011 | Pre-order!

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

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Mark Lanegan – Has God Seen My Shadow? An Anthology 1989-2011
LITA 104 (2xCD | 3xLP Box | Digital)
Available: January 14th, 2014
PRE-ORDER NOW!

‘Tis time to officially release info on the highly anticipated Mark Lanegan anthology that’s been years in the making and on the eager minds of many. As one of America’s great modern day vocalists and songwriters, Mark Lanegan has much in common with the timeless work of such legends as Fred Neil, Tim Hardin and Karen Dalton. The former frontman of Screaming Trees, collaborator with Kurt Cobain and Queens Of The Stone Age, half of a modern day Nancy & Lee with Isobel Campbell and, most commonly, solo artist, Lanegan is a man whose career has been defined by an unwillingness to sit still.

We are set to shine a spotlight on this great American performer and songwriter with the release of Has God Seen My Shadow? An Anthology 1989-2011. Collecting Lanegan’s solo material for Sub Pop, Beggars and more plus 12 unreleased tracks, this is the archive treatment Mark has long deserved. It is released in two sumptuous formats: a Double-CD edition with a gatefold, tip-on jacket and a 44-page booklet comprising hand-written lyrics and rare archive photos by Charles Peterson and Steve Gullick, and a Triple-LP box set, each LP in single pocket jackets within a heavy, tip-on slip case, with a 20-page book featuring the same attention to detail and extras as the Double-CD release.

This 32 track anthology lays bare Mark’s rare talent, spanning his entire career from 1990’s debut album The Winding Sheet to a treasure trove of recent unreleased gems and features such guests as PJ Harvey, Josh Homme and J Mascis. His is a sound of grizzled vocals and dark melody, its lyrics chiseled out of late night thoughts and dark humor.

- Anthology co-produced by Mark Lanegan
- Double CD housed in a handsome gatefold “tip-on” jacket, including 44-pg book comprising hand-written lyrics & rare archive photos
- Vinyl box set includes three “tip-on” jackets, housed in a custom “tip-on” slip case, with a 20-pg book comprising hand-written lyrics & rare archive photos
- Includes 12 unreleased tracks

2014 Light In The Attic Subscription – Part I

Friday, November 8th, 2013

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Shipping is included in the prices below.

$175 LP United States
$230 LP Canada
$250 LP International

$120 CD United States
$140 CD Canada
$170 CD International

ORDER NOW!

* To avoid heavy international postage costs for LP Subscribers, orders outside North America will be sent in 2 parts: the first four LPs will be sent together and then the second batch of 4 LPs will be sent together.

* Canadian CD subscribers will have each CD sent out individually

It’s that time of year again when we announce our upcoming Light In The Attic Subscription Package. You thought 2013 was good. Well, 2014 is going to blow your mind. Similar to our 2013 subscription, there will be some nice extras for subscribers. In 2013, subscribers received an unseen 1960s screenplay for Lee Hazlewood’s Trouble Is A Lonesome Town TV pitch, a repro patch and button set for Public Image Limited, not to mention exclusive Subscriber-only colored vinyl (when available). In 2014, we hope to top that madness. While it is a little early to spill the beans, below is a small sampling of what we have in store for the first half of 2014. As part of your 8 releases, we can promise you a gorgeous Double-CD/Triple-LP anthology a la the same packaging of our recent release I Am The Center: Private Issue New Age Music In America 1950-1990. So without further adieu:

BobbyCharles

Bobby Charles – Bobby Charles
Light In The Attic
(LITA 111 | 180-gram LP)

For the first time in decades, the seminal 1972 Bearsville record from tunesmith Bobby Charles is back on vinyl where it belongs. 10 sublime songs supported by a bevy of titans: Garth Hudson, Rick Danko and Levon Helm of The Band, along with Amos Garrett, Ben Keith, Dr. John, Bob Neuwirth and Billy Mundi. Includes the slow burner “Street People” as featured on our comp Country Funk 1969-1975, Volume 1.24 bit / 96 kHz remaster from the original tapes and pressed on 180 gram LP with an expanded gatefold tip-on jacket..

B&S (675)

The Brothers & Sisters – Dylan’s Gospel
Light In The Attic
(LITA 106 | CD | 180-gram LP)

Originally released in 1969 on Ode Records, this sought-after album finds California collective The Brothers & Sisters covering a clutch of Bob Dylan classics in the era’s revolutionary gospel style. Produced by the legendary Lou Adler (Sam Cooke, Mamas and the Papas, Jan & Dean), and arranged by Gene Page, noted for his work for Motown, the performers were largely unknown but a few, namely Merry Clayton (star of the recent documentary 20 Feet from Stardom), Edna Wright (Honey Cone), and Gloria Jones went on to find great acclaim. The word of Dylan has rarely sounded so stirring. Liner notes interviewing Lou Adler, Merry Clayton and Edna Wright with archive photos. 24 bit / 96 kHz remaster from the original tapes and pressed on 180 gram LP with an expanded gatefold tip-on jacket.

Part I of  Your 2014 Subscription Package Includes:

+ The first 8 CDs or 8 LPs released from Light In The Attic during the first half of 2014, excluding box sets.

+ Select LP releases will include special Subscriber-Only colored wax (when colored vinyl is pressed), not available for non-subscribers or anywhere else in the known universe.

+ 15% off ALL online orders for the entire year, excluding subscriptions (discount code to be sent post-purchase). Discounts may not be used towards the subscription purchase.

+ First dibs on various rarities and exclusives throughout the year

+ Free shipping for Subscription titles

+ Due to licensing restrictions, not every LP release will include a digital download coupon