Hannibal Marvin Peterson: The Tribe | Mythical Unreleased Jazz LP

Long-treasured among jazz fans and record collectors, Hannibal Marvin Peterson’s unreleased album The Tribe is a sacred collection of blistering jazz assaults and deep reflective spirituals from Hannibal’s ten-piece group. The unreleased album is something of a holy grail among collectors, with only a handful of test presses ever made. Now 36 years later, it is ready to be officially released for the first time, and fans of Black Jazz and Strata East won’t have to shell out the $2000+ asking price for what is considered by many to be a lost treasure and one of Hannibal’s best works.

The towering Texan’s primary concern is to always get the music out to the people, and any label should facilitate that. His uncompromising view has lead to a few clashes, notably when his Children Of The Fire album was turned down because of the title, leading him to start his own label Sunrise Records. However, these disagreements also imbue his music with a certain strength, a purity, and a genuine artistic vision. “Once you change one thing, you’re changing things your whole life,” Hannibal says. “It’s like a lie: once you tell one, you have to tell a million more. I’m always looking to make sure that what I play is worthy of the people, and can help them through times of great tribulation.”

Hannibal’s formative years on his grandparents’ farm on the banks of the Colorado are partly responsible for his spiritual, humanistic attitude to music. When describing the Tribe sessions, he says “The Tribe is really like a wild river, like untamed stallions that haven’t been roped off. It’s one of the qualities that I love about it. When you think of stallions running, they build up this high blood. The leader of the stallions stands out alone and looks out on the valley, with a very quiet, stoic look… I love it. I have these images and qualities that I look for when I write a song, that make you feel this instinctive freedom that’s in us, that we have to always fight to maintain. That’s what the search of the inner world is about, that’s an endless search.”

The music on ‘The Tribe’ is a direct descendant of Hannibal’s grandparents singing in the cotton fields. “They didn’t sing to impress a critic or to make a hit record,” Hannibal concludes. “They sang to aspire and to stay alive. That’s why that music is timeless, and it’s as healing today as it was then.” Now that The Tribe is finally out in the wider world, it will surely be here to stay.

To listen to audio samples and order your copy of The Tribe, head to LightInTheAttic.net